Distiller magazine

Distiller_winter_2015/16

Distiller magazine a publication of the American Distilling Institute, the Voice of Artisan Distilling; devoted to the craft spirits industry: vendors and distillers alike.

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92 distiller ere are many different ways to create gin, even before you switch on the still. Even after the distillate is produced, a whole range of different decisions and options exist. A simple way to produce gin is to put botanicals into a pot with base spirit, allow the mix to macerate, run the still with the botanicals in the spirit, and collect the botanical distillate. is is then proofed with water and bottled at the desired strength—this is the one-shot method. Another method is to increase the quantity of botanicals in the still, beyond the original quantity, which results in a botanical concentrate. is concentrate is then diluted with neutral alcohol before proofing with water and being bottled. is "multi-shot" method means that, ceteris paribus, each run of the still results in more final product than the one-shot method. is ratio can be increased from 2:1 up to 35:1 and this method is known as the multi-shot, multi-fold, or concentrate method. Both methods have their supporters and detractors, with followers of the one-shot extolling its greater flavor integration and longevity; whereas concentrate fans suggest that it makes no difference and, therefore, that the concentrate method is more time, energy, and financially efficient. As one distiller put it, "Every hour I'm at the still is an hour I'm not out selling gin." Most major brands use the concentrate method, including brands such as Gordon's, Beefeater, Plymouth and Miller's. In addition to using the still more efficiently, the production of a concentrate reduces shipping costs between the distillery and bottling site, as the neutral spirit is usually added at the same plant where the gin is proofed and bottled. In fact, some gins are distilled GIN Both methods have their supporters and detractors, with followers of the one-shot extolling its greater flavor integration and longevity; whereas concentrate fans suggest that it makes no difference and, therefore, that the concentrate method is more time, energy, and financially efficient. One-Shot vs. Concentrate or Concentrating on Gin with a Single-Shot by David T. Smith

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